I work with PowerPoint on a daily basis and I am very honored to be a Microsoft PowerPoint MVP. We have a talented team of presentation designers at TLC Creative Services and ThePowerPointBlog is our area to highlight PowerPoint tips, tricks, examples and tutorials. Enjoy! Troy Chollar

Podcast 107 announce

A new episode of The Presentation Podcast is available today! Troy, Sandy and Nolan share the episode with Thomas Krafft and Kate Norris of the Presentation Boss podcast for a great cross-over episode! Listen on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Play, Spotify and Soundcloud – or search The Presentation Podcast for “It’s a Crossover! The Presentation Podcast meets the Presentation Boss Podcast” or go direct to the episode page here: https://thepresentationpodcast.com/podcast/107

By |2020-08-03T16:49:57-07:00August 4th, 2020|Resource/Misc|

PowerPoint Metallic Text

We’ve reviewed creating metallic effects on shapes and lines, but the real question is – how does it work on text? The answer is, very well and very easily. Adding metallic effects on text is simple to accomplish in PowerPoint, and the best part is that the text will always remain editable even with the effects applied.

To start off, we’re just applying a gradient to the text. Right-click on your text box (important, make sure it’s the text box and not while editing text) and select FORMAT SHAPE. Go to the TEXT OPTIONS tab, and under TEXT FILL, apply a GRADIENT FILL. Here we used a 6-stop gradient to get all the metallic colors, and a 10° angle to get a reflective effect. Download an editable PowerPoint slide with the Gold, Bronze, and Silver metallic text here.

We can further emphasize the metallic effect by adding a bevel onto the text. This can be tricky depending on the font you use – fonts with thin serifs like this one can be problematic with the bevel, but it worked well in this case. Right-click on your text box and select FORMAT SHAPE. Go to the TEXT OPTIONS tab, then the EFFECTS tab. Adjust the bevel depth until you get the effect you’re looking for. Here we used a slightly different gradient for a different look. Download an editable PowerPoint slide with the Gold, Bronze, and Silver metallic text here.

By |2020-07-28T19:59:28-07:00August 3rd, 2020|PowerPoint|

PowerPoint Metallic Lines

Continuing our exploration of PowerPoint’s capabilities to create metallic effects on shapes, let’s look at how we can create some metallic lines. These are super useful for underline effects, outlines, or other accents in your presentation.

For this first example, we used a very similar gradient to yesterday’s shapes. Select any PowerPoint line, right-click and select FORMAT SHAPE, go to the LINE section, and select the GRADIENT line option. Here we used a linear gradient, 4 gradient stops, but 0 angle. Download an editable PowerPoint slide with the Gold, Bronze, and Silver metallic lines here.

For a more sophisticated metallic look in this example, we added more gradient stops (7 total) with darker colors. The thinner lines also create a more elegant look. Again, create any PowerPoint line, right-click and select FORMAT SHAPE, go to the LINE section, and select the GRADIENT line option. Download an editable PowerPoint slide with the Gold, Bronze, and Silver metallic lines here.

We can make these lines even more convincingly metallic with the same bevel trick that we used with the shapes. The gradient used here is similar to the above 7-stop gradient, with a bevel effect applied on top. Right-click on your PowerPoint line and select FORMAT SHAPE, go to the EFFECTS tab, and open the 3-D FORMAT options. Manipulate the bevel depth for different effects. Download an editable PowerPoint slide with the Gold, Bronze, and Silver metallic lines here.

By |2020-07-28T14:16:11-07:00July 31st, 2020|PowerPoint|

PowerPoint Metallic Shapes

Adobe Illustrator is the best vector art program for creating metallic effects. Adobe Photoshop is an amazing raster image editing app with tons of presets for realistic metallic effects. PowerPoint… We use metallic effects in PowerPoint all the time! These are surprisingly simple gradients that can be created and applied directly in PowerPoint. Over the next several posts, we’re going to highlight some great ways to create and apply metallic effects in PowerPoint.

First up is making a PowerPoint shape have a metallic fill. By using the right colors and gradient stops, you can achieve some pretty nice metallic effects on any sort of PowerPoint shape. Select any PowerPoint shape, right-click and select FORMAT SHAPE, go to the FILL section, and select the GRADIENT fill option. This examples uses a linear gradient, a 60° angle, 4 gradient stops with slightly lighter and darker hues, and an off-center position. 

Download an editable PowerPoint slide with the Gold, Bronze, and Silver metallic shapes here.

You can also make the metallic effect even more emphasized by layering a PowerPoint bevel effect on the shape. Same thing; FORMAT SHAPE > FILL > GRADIENT. Then go to the EFFECTS tab > 3-D FORMAT. Download an editable PowerPoint slide with the beveled effect Gold, Bronze, and Silver metallic shapes here.

By |2020-07-28T13:55:07-07:00July 29th, 2020|PowerPoint|

How to Toggle the Brightslide Instant Selection Pane

Working on densely layered or animated PowerPoint slides is where the Selection Pane shines. It is almost essential to be able to hide select layers. Usually this involves navigating to the selection pane hidden deep in the view tab. Tip: every TLC Creative computer has the Selection Pane on the QAT for fast access. To do things even faster, the Brightslide add-in has a 1 click toggle to turn off the visibility of any element selected!

Select any object, go to BRIGHTSLIDE, SELECTION & OBJECT section, and click the “hide eyeball” icon. Done, object has been turned off on the Selection Pane!

There is only one option in the BrightSlide tools to turn an object back on – that is to turn on ALL of the objects in the selection pane. Go the the Brightslide tab and click the “eye” icon to turn on all hidden layers.

The BrightSlide add-in for PowerPoint can be downloaded for free at: https://www.brightcarbon.com/brightslide/

 

Troy @ TLC

By |2020-07-11T14:00:47-07:00July 27th, 2020|PowerPoint|

Combining Static Images with Videos in PowerPoint

The design team is thinking of cooler weather (it is summer in Southern California right now, so warm – okay, hot). This a nice slide design demonstrating creative combining of static images with videos all in PowerPoint for dynamic slide design concept.

Here is the .jpg image for this example.

Combining Static Images with Videos in PowerPoint 1

Here is the .mp4 video for this example. Note: the bottom grass area is not going to be seen, or a factor in deciding with video. We are only interested in the moving clouds at the top.

Combining Static Images with Videos in PowerPoint 2

In PowerPoint, the blue sky above the mountain range was removed using the Remove Background tool.

Combining Static Images with Videos in PowerPoint 3

The video was then added and positioned under the mountain image (see, the grass area at the bottom of the video is not see).

Combining Static Images with Videos in PowerPoint 4

Some PowerPoint text was added and here is the final composited slide!

Troy @ TLC

By |2021-05-17T13:08:01-07:00July 24th, 2020|PowerPoint|

Google Slide Presentations by TLC Creative

We’ve been taking a deep dive into Google Slides with this blog post series. What better way to wrap up than highlighting some of the Google Slide presentations the TLC Creative design team created. Everyone had the same presentation outline and freedom to develop the presentation in any layout and styling direction.

Amber:

Christie:

Jake:

Sara:

By |2020-07-11T13:53:03-07:00July 22nd, 2020|Resource/Misc|

New Episode on The Presentation Podcast!

A new episode of The Presentation Podcast is available today! Troy, Sandy and Nolan share their lists of presentation designer resources; books/magazines, conferences, forums, online resources, podcasts, training, and information channels.

Listen on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Play, Spotify and Soundcloud – or search The Presentation Podcast for “Presentation Live is Here!” or go direct to the episode page here: https://thepresentationpodcast.com/podcast/106

By |2020-07-18T07:20:56-07:00July 21st, 2020|Resource/Misc|

Presenting with Google Slides

Presenting with Google slides is clean and easy process. In the upper right corner click the PRESENT button.

A direct click on the button puts the presentation in full screen slide show (and there is an app to turn a cell phone into a remote for Google Slides!). Click the drop down menu and a few additional options are available; PRESENT FROM BEGINNING (eg. slide #1), PRESENT ON ANOTHER SCREEN (more on this below), and PRESENTER VIEW!

Yes, a web based app that can leverage a multiple monitors, and it does is very well! PRESENTER VIEW opens in a new window and shows the previous, current and next slides. There is a timer, an Audience Q&A feature and SPEAKER NOTES (that can be formatted with styling)  There is also a drop down menu to jump to any slide in the presentation easily (but like PowerPoint, jumping to a slide in a non-linear order does not respect the applied transition effect).

In the AUDIENCE TOOLS is the polling feature. It assumes everyone watching is on a device, and not watching the presentation on a large event screen. What I was really impressed with is how the audience polling integrated into the Presenter View interface (Microsoft – take note!). 

The PRESENT ON ANOTHER SCREEN is a clean interface to a ChromeCast enabled monitor (I can easily see this as a corporate event option of the presenter connecting to a ChromeCast that is inline with the show equipment, enabling a presenter to run their presentation from stage and roam). I also was excited about the thought of having Presenter View on a phone or tablet and the presentation on a wireless screen – but that is not an option…

There is a way to use Google Slides offline, but the safest approach is to plan to be online while presenting. The presenting experience is clean, easy to use and if using Presenter View, very robust.

Troy @ TLC

By |2020-07-11T13:50:09-07:00July 17th, 2020|Resource/Misc|

Google Slides Export Options

Google Slides has the ability to easily convert your Slides Project into a variety of file types. The export options are PDF, SVG, PNG, TXT, ODP, JPEG and full PowerPoint PPTX.

To export your Slides presentation:

  1. At the top menu bar, click File
  2. Select Download as
  3. Select the file type you would like to export to

The image quality is good, but does not offer the ability to set the exported image size. PDF files render all the visual effects in out creations just fine. The Plain Text output is an interesting option, and while traditional bullet list text heavy slides would work well, it does produce a text document of head scratching puzzlement if it is a visual slide deck with multiple callout text boxes that really are not made to make sense in a word only format. SVG output produced very usable files (and this is a recent addition to PowerPoint too), for me it was primarily a way to get vector graphics into Illustrator or After Effects for use in coordinated design elements (eg. presentation and speaker title intro sizzle video). Last, the ability to export to .pptx is not only the first option in the export list (which is another question – how is the export options list organized? It is not alphabetical, it is not by rank of use, what is it organized by?), but it clearly says PowerPoint is the top of the presentation world and other applications need to play nice with it (PowerPoint offers an export to ODP, which is exactly in the SAVE AS menu not the Export menu, but no .slide or any other application native file type).

Troy @ TLC

By |2020-07-11T13:35:54-07:00July 15th, 2020|Resource/Misc|
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